Monday, July 21, 2014

New Interceptor Crafts For The Malaysian Navy

The Royal Malaysian Navy has recently announced that they have acquired new high speed interceptor boats that will operate out of the Bunga Mas 5 (BM5) that will act as the mother ship in her role to protect the Sabah east coast against potential threats.

The BM5 In Port Klang In June 2014

The BM5 which will serve as a forward sea base equipped with high-speed interceptor boats, radar surveillance and helicopters. The three interceptor combat boats (CB90) will be used together with the rigid hull inflatable boats (RHIBs) that are currently being used by the navy’s elite sea commando unit (Paskal) and two new boats that were recently acquired by the navy – the Silver Brize and P38 craft.“The Bunga Mas 5 is the right choice to be placed in the area as it has a surveillance radar system and is equipped with helicopters to carry out night operations over long distances,” said navy chief Admiral Tan Sri Abdul Aziz Jaafar.

The P38 craft seems to have been purchased from UES Marine, a division of United Engineering Services LLC, Oman. Their Signature Interceptor Vessel the P-38, these UES interceptor boats can be tailor made as per the customers' requirements. The P38 is a high performance interceptor craft designed for interdiction of hostile vessels in coastal and offshore waters. It is an open boat well-suited for boarding, beaching and interdiction operations. It features advanced deep V step design hull which is 3D infused with advanced composite materials in epoxy resin for optimum power to weight ratio and maximum strength. The hull form and design affords maximum comfort for this type of craft allowing the crew to operate effectively with minimum fatigue. The P38 is designed to accommodate up to 12 crew and is equipped for missions of 12 to 24 hours. 

The P38 can be fitted to meet customised mission requirements, such as triple 50 caliber machine gun mounts. To protect your crew, ballistic NIJ Level lll extended height paneling can be installed into the sides of the cockpit.

Unfortunately the Silver Brize boats I am unable to identify but once I do i will surely include details of it here later.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Jangan Jadi Jahil Lah!


Hakikatnya bagi mereka yang hanya tahu menjerit di Facebook tapi jahil fakta, Malaysia sudah lama menghantar pasukan tentera hadapannya ke bumi Palestin untuk berhadapan dengan tentera rejim Israel.

Walaupun hanya dilengkapi dengan kenderaan perisai usang kerana pihak pembangkang selalu tanya, "mau bili itu senjata mau lawan siapa", pada dasarnya bila negara-negara Islam bersatu satu masa nanti dan akhirnya mengisytiharkan jihad, berbanggalah yang negara kita dan negara serantau iaitu Indonesia dan Brunei(yang menempatkan anggotanya bersama kontijen kita) akan beraksi dari awal lagi.

Tak percaya? Tanyalah bekas-bekas tentera-tentera pengaman kita yang pernah bertugas di Bosnia-herzegovina kenapa Harimau Malaya digeruni pihak serbia dan croatia. Ingat fasal bola ke?

Tidak perlulah elemen-elemen sokongan termasuk dari TUDM berada di sana kalau setakat tentera kita setakat nak "bersiar-siar" di sana. Bila jihad sebenar berlaku, bala tentera kita tidak akan masuk medan dengan mata buta nanti, InsyaAllah.

Jadi sabarlah hati, tawakkallah dengan percaturan Allah. Dia maha mengetahui apa yang Dia kehendaki.



Malbatt 850-1 Kibarkan Bendera Tradisi Pengaman Malaysia

MARAKAH (LUBNAN), 14 Julai — Perjalanan darat dari ibu negara Lubnan, Beirut, ke sini mengambil masa kira-kira dua jam merentasi kawasan luar bandar yang dipenuhi kebun pisang, ladang oren dan buah zaitun yang tumbuh subur.


mykmu.net

Friday, May 30, 2014

We do not forget. Congrats!

As mentioned in series of tweets by the Prime Minister, we have never forgotten those who were abducted in Sabah waters. Congrats for the successful operations to recover the abductees.


I have just been briefed by that the two women abducted from a resort in Sabah last Apr have been rescued by our authorities.

We are taking steps to facilitate the return of the Chinese national to her home as soon as possible.

No ransom paid to secure their release. Success due to cooperation of Malaysia & Philippines security forces. I thank all involved.








Monday, May 12, 2014

Sea Basing ? Not Such A New Concept

When the navy chief Admiral Tan Sri Abdul Aziz Jaafar espoused the concept of Sea Basing and then further elaborated by the Minister of Defence himself, many has jumped on the comment bandwagon as if it is such a new concept. Many may have forgotten that the Navy has used their MPSS for such a purpose at a time in their history before as evidenced by this photo off the Sabah coast where the Inderapura played the role of mothership for the Jerong class FAC-Gs.


It has also been reported that a decommissioned oil rig has been proposed to be used as a logistics base or mothership but to me that is a bit wild as such oil rigs typically ride high over the water and easy ingress and egress for the vessels that they are supposed to support may be difficult, amongst others.

The Oil Rig Solution as mentioned in the MOD tweet " May 9 
Kita boleh! “: H2O: ESSCOM:"Sea Basing" suggested by TS PTL doable wit designated route by

As for using the existing remaining MPSSs or the Auxilliary ships BM5 and BM6 as the motherships, I quite agree but the lead time may take a long time as the MPSS would surely need to be replaced by a new class of MRSS in their current logistics role while the BM5 and BM6 are still preoccupied with their missions in the far oceans. 

So what is the navy to do to then to materialise the creation of a small naval base offshore on urgent basis? There is another methodology of sea-basing that the Navy has successfully implemented in their efforts to safeguard our territory before, that is to build up artificial reefs like we have in the Spratlys where we created some of the bases overnight in fact by grounding barges and building up the land around it. In fact since the land borders for the ESSCOMM is clearly defined, we could even build it at a proper but quick pace and give it a proper naval base functionality than a rush job like the proposed oil rig solution.

Ubi Reef

Sometimes the simpler method could be the best don't you think?

Thursday, April 17, 2014

DSA 2014 - Hmmmmm Humbug?

I initially did not want to attend the show this year as I suspected that there is nothing much new that will be on show. Nonetheless a relative asked me to attend as he wanted to ask me for assistance in business networking so I relented and attended on the third day, the first time doing so. It was as I suspected but since it was already at the tail end of the show, nothing much was being announced when I was there.Therefore this time I will just make a pictorial of what captured my attention the most during my brief visit.

The star of the show would surely be the AV8s on show where both the AFV-30 and IFV-25 variant is on show. I was informed that 11 units are now ready to be inducted into the army in the near future as the first delivery.






And from the DEFTECH representative that I met that was premiering their AV6 or actually the rebadged PARS 6x6, I was informed that there will finally be a field testing of 6x6 armoured vehicles in order to fulfil the UNIFIL requirements. No wonder there was a lot 6x6 units being displayed except for a particular brand from a neighbouring country that previously claimed the contract was already awarded to them. Hopefully this will be a nucleus order for the full replacement of the Condor fleet of battle taxis.




The AV6 is currently displayed with the proposed weapon,

25 mm STOP Remote Controlled Stabilized Naval Gun System


The emblem although different from PARS belies its origins, mayhaps now in the form of an ODE to Proton?
Deftech also took the opportunity to showcase their HMMWV in partnership with AM General which a friend informed me was trialed in the north sometime last year.



Also in association with Bell Helicopters, an USMC UH-1Y 'Huey" made an appearance as the solo static helicopter being openly displayed to public although an AW139 was in one of the booths. The Huey was flown all the way from Afghanistan in a C5 and assembled in Subang before being flown in to the PWTC open carpark where it was displayed.





And now lets continue to the eye candies shall we. The local agent for Rotinor's divescooter for use by the Malaysian Special Forces creative costuming of their promoters certainly attracted a lot of visitors to their booth. Hopefully it is accepted into service soon.


It was claimed that the use of the leash would allow a team of 6 to be transported by a single scooter. Interesting right?
And finally don't forget to YUK visit Indo Defence 2014.







Monday, April 14, 2014

And Yet Some Asks Our Navy To Use Prahus To Patrol

An interesting read on how the MH370 incident and subsequent SAR efforts has revealed the capability gaps of the nations' military involved, in this case in particular the China's maritime capabilities.However China's booming military spending as detailed in this other article may rectify the gaps in the long run.

China-Japan Military Balance
Yes China will learn from this incident but pity Malaysia's own military. I personally do not think that our military will get what they need even though their shortfalls are now plain to see with only a single navy frigate and three C-130H involved in the SAR efforts in the Indian Ocean even though we are the primary nation affected. Nonetheless the DSA 2014 has just started today and hopefully we can get some good news on military procurement despite the odds.

Published: Sunday April 13, 2014 MYT 12:00:00 AM
Updated: Sunday April 13, 2014 MYT 8:36:56 AM

China’s tech gap exposed in MH370 search mission 

Ability in doubt: Chinese patrol ship 'Haixun 01' picked up electronic pulsing signals in the Indian Ocean on April 4 and again on April 5. But some foreign experts are sceptical about whether China's equipment is advanced enough to obtain signals from as deep as 4,500m under the sea. - EPA
BEIJING: China has the ability to detect signals sent from deep in the sea, but the month-long hunt for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has exposed technological drawbacks in China’s maritime search and rescue outfit, experts said.

Chinese patrol ship Haixun 01 picked up electronic pulsing signals in the Indian Ocean on April 4 and again on April 5. But some foreign experts are sceptical about whether China’s equipment is advanced enough to obtain signals from as deep as 4,500m under the sea.

The ship is equipped with maritime detection equipment, including one black box sonar detector and two underwater robots, said Wang Liangyu, head of maritime survey at the Donghai Navigation Safety Administration under the Transport Ministry.

“All of them were imported,” he said. “The black box detector, which was made by the same company that produces black boxes, has a maximum detection range of 5,000m.”

The adoption of such advanced technologies has enabled China to catch “ping” signals from the black boxes, he told Shanghai newspaper Jiefang Daily.

However, searchers need more time to analyse and verify the signals to see whether they are consistent with the black boxes – the flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder.

Many Chinese applauded Haixun 01’s findings, but say China still lags behind other nations when it comes to maritime search and rescue equipment.

“I’m proud that it was our ship that first detected the (suspected) signals,” said an Internet user who goes under the name biedong1925, “but it is a pity that none of the equipment used was made in China”.

Some experts said more resources and investment should be allocated to China’s maritime search and rescue outfit development.

“There are a lot of things that China should do to upgrade its equipment used in maritime search and rescue operations,” said Cui Yiliang, an expert on ships and naval armament in Beijing.

“We must speed up the research and development of autonomous underwater vehicles, or AUVs,” he said. 

“High-tech underwater vehicles such as the Bluefin-21 play an irreplaceable role in deep-sea detection and retrieval operations, but I haven’t read any reports about similar equipment developed in China.”

The Australian navy vessel Ocean Shield is carrying a Bluefin-21 in its current search and will use the sub to scan for wreckage once the black box is located.

AUV played a critical role in locating a lost Air France jet in 2011, two years after it crashed in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. A team from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the United States used an AUV equipped with side-scan sonar to locate the aircraft about 3,900m underwater. In China, the AUV is still in its infancy and far from being operational, Cui said.

In November, the Qianlong-1 unmanned autonomous underwater vehicle completed its first application test in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

Co-developed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Harbin Engineering University, it can travel to a depth of 6,000m, and is tasked to explore the seabed and collect hydrological data. The vehicle is on a trial run and marks the first time a Chinese AUV has been used for a scientific expedition, according to the academy.

Meanwhile, a military observer said the Chinese navy should improve its use of sea-based air platforms in maritime search and rescue operations.

The PLA navy’s missile destroyer Haikou, replenishment ship Qiandaohu, and amphibian landing craft Kunlunshan and Jinggangshan are taking part in the search mission led by Australia in a remote part of the Indian Ocean.

However, the fleet “apparently failed to bring enough helicopters”, said the observer in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, who declined to be named.

The two Arleigh Burke-class destroyers of the US Navy that had participated in the early search for MH370, the USS Pinckney and USS Kidd, each carried two MH-60R Seahawk helicopters, which flew sorties from dawn to dusk.

“Each Arleigh Burke-class destroyer can carry up to four helicopters, which means it has a strong capability to search on the sea,” the observer said, adding Chinese destroyers and frigates can carry only one helicopter.

The amphibian landing craft Kunlunshan and Jinggangshan can each embark up to four helicopters, he said. 

“But judging from news reports, they didn’t bring that number of helicopters. The only guess I can make is that our navy still needs to learn from the US Navy in the use of sea-based air platforms.”

Friday, April 4, 2014

Littoral Combat Ship - Finally ?

I myself cannot remember when was supposed to be the actual launch date :-)
Published: Friday April 4, 2014 MYT 12:00:00 AM
Updated: Friday April 4, 2014 MYT 7:27:55 AM

BHIC to build first littoral combat ship in 2015 


KUALA LUMPUR: Boustead Heavy Industries Corp Bhd (BHIC) expects to build the first littoral combat ship (LCS) early next year, under a RM9bil contract awarded to its associate company.
This, coupled with the group’s growing maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) business, will help the company improve its financial performance in the current financial year ending Dec 31, 2014.

“We are confident of doing much better this year. BHIC’s order book for shipbuilding and MRO for this year is more than RM500mil,” managing director Tan Sri Ahmad Ramli Mohd Nor told reporters after the company’s AGM yesterday.

He said the LCS programme was ahead of schedule and that actual work at the group’s shipyard in Lumut, Perak was expected to commence once the LCS project contract was finalised.

“We are already more or less at 35%. A lot of pre-planning is being done,” he said. Project revisions and cost overuns related to the LCS project hit the group last year as its associate company Boustead Naval Shipyard Sdn Bhd reported loss of RM23.2mil in the financial year of 2013.

Ahmad Ramli said the revisions took into consideration the negotiated scope of work with various stakeholders, including the navy and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). He added that 80% of contracts with the OEMs was already in place.

The building of the ships required a lot of imported high-end equipment, something which the company was wary about, he said, adding that the projected cost could vary with the value of the ringgit fluctuating against major currencies.

“We purchased a lot of equipment from overseas. So the movements of the ringgit do have a big impact on our shipbuilding business. But the project is on track and will start in the first quarter of next year,” chairman Tan Sri Lodin Wok Kamaruddin said.


According to The Edge Financial Daily on this matter, 35% of the project has already been completed as follows ;

On the RM9 billion littoral combat ship contract from the Defence Ministry, Ahmad Ramli said Boustead Naval Shipyard Sdn Bhd, an associate of BHIC, has progressed around 35% of the project, mostly on the aspects of the design work, training of manpower and improvement of infrastructure.

“The actual work itself will start in Lumut in the first quarter of next year,” he added.